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, this is going to have a hit on their long-term earning potenti potential. in a sense, the u.s. faces swlar problems, kbu on a much, much lower scale. >> our next call comes from michelle in woodbury, new jersey, on our line for independents. go ahead. >> caller: i have two comments and i would like to ask a question. our regional banks are owned by some european banks. and they're not accountable to the united states. also there is a move to make america, canada and mexico one region. my question is this. can you tell us what the central bank system is in europe and whether they are accountable? and is the idea of waging our lives in europe rather than having nations affect the people of europe? thank you. >> mr. lombardi? >> yeah, this is really about financial globalization. right now, you know, the caller was reminding us these financial flows do provide opportunities, but clearly sometimes also pose issues. european banks, you know, may well have stakes in u.s. banks, but it is also true the contrary that the u.s. banks clearly are very -- have a very international reach and therefore
activist chen quangcheng, who was transferred to a beijing hospital from the u.s. embassy there wednesday. the u.s. government announced chen would be moved to a safe location within the country reflecting his choice. the move was based on an agreement with china. on thursday, chen revealed his concerns to nhk in a telephone interview. >> he also said chinese authoritiy ies have set up seve new surveillance cameras at his home where his mother still lives. chen says the reassurances he got before leaving the embassy have not been kept and his rights are being violated. u.s. state department spokesperson victoria nuland said chen had a change of mind after half a day in the hospital. she added the u.s. government is rethinking its agreement with china and negotiating the possibility of chen and his family abroad. chinese government is trying to avoid a lengthy dispute that could accelerate demands for democracy. >>> the united states and china ended their first day of strategic and economic dialogue in beijing. there were clear differences of opinion on their trade imbalance. the two day t
market moves. >> most major markets around the world fell yesterday and u.s. and european shares no exception. share prices went tumbling overnight on u.s. and europe markets due to worsening concerns over europe's credit problems. [ bell ringing ] in new york, the dow jones industrial average dipped nearly 160 points at one stage. the key index finished the day at 12,695, down 125 points, or just below 1% from last week's close. over in europe, stock prices dropped even more sharply. frankfurt was down nearly 2%, italy and spain, 2.7% each, greece saw a fall of 4.6%. meanwhile, over in the bond market, investors unloaded the sovereign debts of fiscally strained countries, yields for ten-year government bonds briefly rose to the 6.3% level in spain and to 5.7% in italy. so how are overnight moves affecting japanese shares this morning? we go to ramin mellegard who is at the tokyo stock exchange for more. ramin, markets remain super jittery. what should investors here be focusing on? >> good morning to you, ai. you mentioned some key factors there, of course, markets really weighe
chinese citizens do. >> chen escaped from house arrest and sought help at the u.s. embassy in beijing. he was transferred to a hospital on wednesday following negotiations between the chinese and u.s. governments. the u.s. said chen had agreed to move to a safe place of his own choice in china with his family, but the blind activist later said he wanted to go to the united states with his family, forcing the two governments to resume negotiations over his fate. chen earlier asked for a meeting with u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. testifying by telephone before a u.s. congressional commission, he said he no longer feels safe in china and wants to leave for the united states. >> the activist said he wants to meet clinton, who is visiting beijing, to seek further support and to thank her face to face. >> your case is the test, the test of the chinese commitment to protect you, which they've given. we're very dubious about those assurances. >> the commission chairman said the u.s. congress will take up the issue adding that the american commitment to the human rights is being put to
i'm yuko aotani in tokyo. >>> u.s. officials say they foiled a plot to bomb a civilian airliner bound for the u.s. >> what this incident makes clear is that this country has to continue to remain vigilant against those that would seek to attack this country. >> fbi officials say agents tracked an improvised explosive device over seas and seized it in recent days. fbi experts are now examining the bomb. it was similar to the one known as the underwear bomb used in a failed attempt to attack a u.s. bound flight in 2009. u.s. officials have not released any other details of the plot. u.s. media are reporting al qaeda's affiliate in yemen was targeting a flight heading to the u.s. they say the group had not decided on a specific flight. the reports say the timing was aimed around the first anniversary of the death of al qaeda leader, osama bin laden. u.s. forces killed him a year ago last week. >>> german chancellor angela merkel enjoyed a strong partnership with sarkozy. and she might take some time to get used to his successor and they have a showdown scheduled for how to manage e
♪ >>> past, present, future. people gather in okinawa to mark the 40th anniversary of the end of u.s. control and to talk about plans to reduce the american military's burden on local communities. welcome to nhk world "newsline." the southern okinawa islands have been at the heart of japan/u.s. relations for decades from world war ii to the u.s. handover on may 15th, 1972, to now 40 years after the transition. a time when american military bases still take up large parts of the main island. residents and leaders came together against that backdrop to commemorate the anniversary and look ahead. about 1,200 people attended a ceremony at the okinawa convention center. among them japanese prime minister yoshihiko noda, okinawan governor hirokazu nakaima, u.s. ambassador to japan, john roos, and local representatives. noda used his speech to stress his government's efforts to strengthen okinawa's economy and said he's committed to change. >> translator: i'm fully aware of the heavy burden u.s. military facilities are imposing on people in okinawa. i reiterate my determination to reduce th
into the evolution of how you tracked that, how the u.s. intelligence and national security world has tracked that, can we talk about the health of the organization which is at the major milestone, the 1-year anniversary of the bin laden raid. how are they doing? >> guest: i think how is al-qaeda doing depends on which part of the organization we're talking about. the core group based in pakistan that was led by bin laden until he was killed a year ago, that organization has definitely struggled somewhat. it's lost the range of its senior operational leaders, religious leaders, and operatives, but it thrives to some degree. it still has key founding members, one involved in running the organization. al-ahbi is now number two with a wealth of experience in africa and a vast number of places. the organization, at the center, has been weakened somewhat, but as we'll talk about in a little bit, as you look at the affiliates in places like yemen, for example, it is arguably strengthened based on its levels of violence, its territorial control on the ground, and a range of other factors, so part of the
channel because authorities also refused to issue a visa for her replacement. chan is a u.s. citizen and had been reporting from china for al jazeera's english channel since 2007. she has covered social problems including what goes on at facilities that temporarily detain people who try to lodge petitions with the government. the foreign correspondents club of china has denounced the incident. it says that this is the most extreme example of a recent pattern of china's government using visas to censor and intimidate journalists from abroad. in 1998, china expelled a japanese generalist. chinese spokesperson hong lei said they must obey by chinese laws and regulations while covering stories in the country. china is tightening the control of the foreign media before the convention. a new leadership will be established at the meeting. nhk world, beijing. >>> human rights in china are again in the spotlight. the latest incident centers on activist chan. chen escaped from house arrest last month and sought protection at the u.s. embassy. he's now waiting at a beijing hospital for a possib
everywhere we. of seeing regions different from the u.s., other countries, taking advantage. probably in a more aggressive way. >> finally, the fda agreement between colombia and the united states has been signed and ratified. what does that mean for both countries? >> it means a lot of jobs, first of all. yes, jobs. in the case of a colombia, at least 250,000 jobs, new jobs, associated with the development of the free trade agreement. in the u.s., colombian trade and market, we create a lot of new jobs and opportunities for americans. >> you kind of made reference to this earlier in the conversation, that may be in the past there was a stereotype towards colombia which was the drugs and violence and human rights. but now it is education, technology, energy, culture. a vast change in 10 or 12 years. >> we have to recognize the leaders of that change. the president and his team -- part of the team, and as minister of defense -- i was the minister of defense. in those eight years of the two governments, his stamina, leadership, a commitment to evolve from a country that was almost at th
will wind up in the hands of the u.s. should assange be deported. he has been given 14 days to return to sweden. the u.s. and 11 other countries have formally expelled syrian diplomats following a massacre of over 100 people in the village of houla. in a coordinated action, countries including germany, france, britain, canada, and japan ordered the departure of syrian ambassadors from their capitals. in washington, state department's spokesperson victoria nuland said syria's top diplomat in the u.s. has been told to leave. >> this morning, we call then syrian zuheir jabbour and gave him 72 hours to depart. we took this action in response to the massacre in the village of houla, absolutely indefensible, weil, despicable massacre against innocent children, women, shot at point- blank range by regime thugs, aided and abetted by the iranians who were actually bragging about it over the weekend. >> dozens of children were killed in the houla attack, which marked one of the deadliest single incidents of the 15-month uprising against bashar al-assad. it is widely believed syrian forces commi
america in the 20th century. a course on the social, political and cultural die namics of u.s. cities after world war ii. american history tv in primetime starts at 8:00 p.m. eastern all this week on c-span3. >>> this weekend on book tv, and afterwards, seth jones documents the war against al qaeda since 9/11 in hunting in the shadows. he's interviewed by ap intelligence reporter kimberly dozier. also this weekend your questions and comments for tom brokaw in death penalty. book tv every weekend on c-span2. >>> spend a weekend in oklahoma city with book tv and american eastern check in on literary life with book tv on c-span2 including the governor's must read political books. oklahoma university president on his letter to america. also rare books from gal lie low, from the history of science collection at ou. sunday at 5:00 p.m. eastern, oklahoma history at american history tv on c-span3. tour the oklahoma city bombing memorial with the co-designer. plus a look into african-american life in 1920s oklahoma and native american artifacts from the special collections at the oklahoma hist
moveme, or migration both within mexico and north tohe u.s. we explore a major and unexpected source of migrants caedolw re weskf e usion can change the rate of flow, or if a new u.s. border policy is having an untended consequence. ( helicopter whirring ) narrator: every day, thousands of mexicans cross the border illegally into the united states. ofte those hopes are arreste manyre at the border.o. man: ahora lista pont la mano en frente... narrator the u.s. i.n.s., or immigration and naturalization service, records each apprehension on standard forms, including one entrywith hid: it was the migrants' home towns inexico. that's whabringseographe richard jones tohe i.n it was the migrants' home towns with a novel reseaplan. jones knows that economic conditions vary greatly om region to region in mexico. he suspects that some places drive out-- or "push"-- many more migrants to the u.s. than others. his investigation begins inly90s aris hom inanoniotes. his ijos lieveson begins many secrets are stored in i.n.s. files like tse. can they reveal where most migrants come om? can the answ
>>> evasive action. u.s. president obama won't comment on the case of a missing chinese dissident but encouraging them to improve the human rights. people around the world are talking about him but not obama in public. he escaped house arrest last week. obama is refusing to comment on reports he's hiding out at the american embassy in beijing. he's only speaking with u.s./china relations and outlining how they could benefit if certain conditions were met. >> we also believe that that relationship will that much stronger and china will be that much more prosperous and strong as you see improvements on human rights issues in that country. >> obama says he's aware of the reports regarding chen, but he's refusing to make a statement on the issue. chen is blind. he's campaigned against forced abortions under china's one-child policy. activists say he fled his home and arrived in beijing four days later and seven-day outlook protection at the american embassy. u.s. assistant secretary of state arrived earlier than expected for talks between the two countries. he's discussing chen ace ca
the world, this is "newsday". >> the chinese dissident left the u.s. embassy in beijing because he feared for the safety of his wife and children. he had been given refuge in the embassy after escaping from house arrest last month. his presence in the embassy had overshadowed a visit to china by hillary clinton with chinese authorities accusing the u.s. of unacceptable interference in its internal affairs. our correspondent has details. >> this is one of the biggest hospitals in beijing. chinese security agents desperate to keep one of the bestknown human-rights activists hidden. at the end of the corridor in a wheelchair we have glimpsed him. his leg was injured, brought here by u.s. diplomats who negotiated a deal with china for him to get medical treatment and to study freely. his safety guaranteed. the silhouettes of his wife and children, long held captive by chinese security, reunited with him under the deal. >> she said she was [inaudible] >> the blind lawyer became an icon of human rights abuses after he exposed the way thousands of women had undergone forced abortion. for seven y
to congressman smith when he was at the u.s. embassy. although one of the many questions surrounding chance? is why the phone call was never facilitated. as the new cycle a fully ago began as a a purported diplomatic triumph evolved into diplomatic fiasco. now the fate of this man and his family hangs in the balance. while details are still emerging it appears the most generous read of the administration's handle of this case is that it was naÏve and accepting assurances from a government that is well-known and documented history of brutally repressing its own people under this government. here are some of the following, and if you think about some these things in the last you all more than 30 tibetans, monks and nuns including several who were very young, have set themselves a flame in desperation. every one of the approximately 25 underground catholic bishops is either in jail or under house arrest order to restrict surveillance organizing. leaders are routinely imprisoned and harassed. lawyers that defend them are often given the same fate. when i travel to china with congressman smith
and a possible third wave to for a given to the evolution of how we track and how the u.s. intelligence if he has tracked that to talk about the organizations that have passed a milestone and the one-year anniversary of the osama bin laden raid, how are they doing. >> guest: how is al qaeda doing depends much for the organization we're talking about it's led by osama bin laden guinn a year ergo. organizations have a definitely struggled somewhat lost the range of its senior operational leaders and operatives with his but it has survived to some degree it still has some key founding members including running the organization will come in now the number to come he has a wealth of experience in north africa and places. at the center it's been weakened somewhat, but we can talk about it in a little bit when you look out across the facility in places like yemen for example it has arguably strengthen the based on its level of violence, its territorial control on the ground in the range of other factors so part of the other answer depends on what part of al qaeda and a group that is clearly decentralizi
years since it was returned to japan from u.s. rule. a lot has changed in okinawa in the past 40 years. people in the prefecture hope this year will bring even more change. they want more economic development and want issues surrounding u.s. bases to be settled. the national government has invested about $125 billion in okinawa since the prefecture was returned. yet, a worker there can only expect to earn about three quarters of the average income in japan. many are frustrated with the continuing u.s. military presence. more than 70% of u.s. military facilities in japan are located in okinawa. the national government has been trying to relocate the u.s. marine corps futenma air station to nago city on the coast. negotiators from the u.s. and japan agreed to move in 1996. now, okinawa government leaders want the base moved out of the prefecture. an nhk survey suggests 71% of okinawa residents think people elsewhere in japan don't understand their concerns. the figure has increased by 10 percentage points from another survey ten years ago. japanese government leaders say they intend to p
in maryland. and the u.s. hosts nato head of states in chicago. next a preview of the g-8 summit and u.s./russia relations. former u.s. ambassador to nato, nicholas ferns taulks about the future of nato. >> when people are saying to him -- don't take the vice presidency. right now you are a powerful majority leader. don't take the vice presidency. you won't hatch any powve any p. johnson says power is where power goes. meaning i can make power in any situation. his whole life. nothing in his life previously makes that seem like he is boasting. because that's exactly what he had done. all his life. >> sunday night, the conclusion of our conversation with robert caro on the passage of power, volume four the years of lyndon johnson. sunday night on cspan's, q and a. >> the center for strategic and international studies hosted a forum last week on u.s./russia relations. panelists include the former u.s. ambassador to russia, and the current russian ambassador to the u.s. this comes ahead of the g-8 summit at camp dach vid this we. >> welcome. i'm meredith, the chair in international business
, with details on this latest security scare. good morning, tahman. >> reporter: the focus is on u.s. carriers. the concern, terrorists will target americans overseas and u.s. flights coming in from overseas. with tonight marking the one-year anniversary of osama bin laden's death, security is tight here in the u.s., amid fears of a potential new threat. abc news has learned that u.s. authorities have concerns over terrorists using body bombs. a terrorist could have explosives surgically implanted in his body, perhaps in the stomach. >> the surgeon would open the abdominal cavity, and literally plant the explosive device amongst the internal organs. >> reporter: over the past year, u.s. and european authorities have warned that the master bombmaker for the al qaeda affiliate in yemen, ibrahim al asiri, has been designing body bombs with no metal parts to get past security. as a result, security has stepped up in the united states, the united kingdom and the middle east. >> nobody wants to be the person who overlooked a clue. that's happened in the past. and we've paid for it. >> reporter: u.s.
wednesday to 33 years in prison for treason. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton denounced the ruling as unjust. she says the obama administration will continue to pursue the issue with pakistani authorities. u.s./pakistan relations worsened after american special forces raided a compound near islamabad last may and killed bin laden. they took another hit after u.s. helicopters killed 24 pakistani soldiers last november. pakistan's government retaliated by closing supply routes for nato forces in afghanistan. foreign minister khar says u.s. authorities should apologize for the deaths of the soldiers, if they want their routes reopened. >> as if to say if we lose 24 people, one of the parliamentary recommendations is 24 of our soldiers are killed or lie dead, we must be offered an apology for that loss, because there was nobody hurt on the other side. >> khar argues improving u.s./pakistan relations isn't easy. the anti-american sentiment in her country is growing. >> it's a tough job. we are working on it. we are of course showing a lot of -- we are showing a lot of leadership in paki
>>> double agent. the suicide bomber al qaeda chose to take down a u.s. bound airliner was actually worked for the cia. >>> ousted after losing a primary to a tea party challenger, senator richard lugar has tough words for his opponents. >>> baring arms. transportation officials find parts of a gun and ammunition in a stuffed toy by a rhode island airline passenger. this is the "cbs morning news" for wednesday, may 9, 2012. >>> good morning. thanks for joining us. i'm danielle nottingham. al qaeda was duped. the would-be terrorist chosen by al qaeda to destroy a u.s.-bound airliner with an improved underwear bomb was actually a double agent. instead of carrying out the murderous mission, he delivered the bomb to u.s. intelligence officials. "the new york times" reports the informant is an intelligent agent for saudi arabia. susan mcginnis is in washington with the latest. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. an incredible intelligence coup. the al qaeda affiliate developed this advanced bomb. they think they're giving it to a suicide bomber but they hand it right over to an agen
policies that are counter to u.s. interests, so the point to the disagreement about syria, there is no question that the syria issue is seriously poisoned russia's perception, reputation, on capitol hill right now because it is such a big issue in the headlines. our inability to come to an agreement about missile defense, aspects of russia's relationship with iran while in fact actually i think that our cooperation with the russians on iran has been quite extensive. there are a whole series of concerns that people will have there about aspects of russian, foreign and security policy. then i think more pertinent to susan and klaus' area, there are concerns about how russia does business. there are concerns about whether russia will actually live up to the wto commitments that it has made, and whether adequate -- i hate to use this word, concessions, were made in the negotiations as part of the agreement on intellectual property rights, sanitary standards, et cetera, et cetera. so i think sort of broadly there are these three constituencies that have various objections for d
agencies. can i begin, mr. kramer, with the decisions that have been taken on the u.s. downgrade? does s&p accept it made a $2 trillion mistake in assessing the size of the u.s. budget deficit reduction plan? >> good morning. the u.s. downgrade in august last year was based on three main factors. the first one was the high level of debt -- >> i'm just asking you very -- >> no, i come to that. the answer is no. we don't accept it. i don't accept it. >> okay. >> i was about to explain what happened. >> what don't you accept of what was set out by the assistant secretary for economic policy on 6 august 2011? what is it that you don't accept? >> okay. >> about the $2 trillion? i'm not asking you about whether it was right to downgrade or not. >> correct. >> first of all, i'm just ask you about this $2 trillion alleg allegeded error. >> right. the discussion with the treasury department in washington was about which of the scenarios, which were published by the congressional budget office which as nonpartisan institution, which be underlying the analysis. originally, the s&p team was of the a
of who wins the elections in egypt, neither is good news for the u.s. do you agree or disagree? can you elaborate on what is going on on the ground? guest: a lot of people feel this has become the worst case scenario for egypt, the most polarizing options have come to the forefront. the islamist candidates are much more conservative than others and people see the other as part of the mubarak regime. so when they were talking about how polarizing the runoff could be, more than 50% did not choose on election day. >> when you talk to voters in cairo, what questions are you asking more what are you hearing from these folks? >> are you talking about on election day? guest: we are getting a sense of real fear from those who voted for the other candidates. what they feel right now is to not very great choices. the former military officer has openly said the rule of an iron fist is needed. or do i vote a more conservative system here? a lot of these people feel there is no good choice and what do i do your? you also hear a lot of people talking about boycotting and said of choosing between cand
." as well as interviews with with current and former officials of u.s. government. this weeks guest is kimberly dozier. >> seth, now is the time just all the questions that i've been wanting to ask you the last two years. operational commanders here in the field, and in the think tank world. let's launch with your new book, "hunting in the shadows." we talked about three waves of al qaeda with violence and a possible third wave. your book gets into the evolution of how the u.s. intelligence and national security world has checked that can you talk about that. we just passed the one-year anniversary. how are they doing? >> i think it depends on the core group based in pakistan that was led by osama bin laden and was killed a year ago. that organization has definitely struggled somewhat. it has lost the range of its senior operational upper leaders. religious readers and operatives. many have survived to some degree. it still has some key members that are running the organization. [inaudible name] is now the number two. he has a great deal of experience in africa and other places. the
for that period. it was primarily targeting u.s. military facilities, embassies, but not killing large numbers of civilians. they targeted the uss cole, embassies in tanzania and in kenya, and then as we got up to 9/11, it became clear that there was really no u.s. strategy executed on the ground against al qaeda. it had a limited selective engagement strategy, killing minimal civilians, and it had an enemy who had not identified it as a major threat. it had the people but the administration would not identified as the main threat. >> host: so it was that pointed organization that had been meaning to attack supplies but not at home. were they not taking it seriously enough? >> guest: if it was clear they were summoned and jewels from the commission report, the organization was like the cia including the bin laden unit of the cia that identified and logged in and had identified grave concerns about plotting attacks in the west, including in the united states. we know that arraignment of individuals like richard clark were ringing alarm bells at the white house level but again, at that point, we
and unpredictable. that's why the u.s. and south korea are keeping their militaries at the ready. air force personnel from both nations are staging the largest ever joint drill on the korean peninsula. nhk world reports from seoul. >> reporter: the pilot of this plane takes off for an exercise called max thunder. the crews of 50 jets from the u.s. and south korea are taking part. >> and when we train together, we know there is no force that can beat us. >> reporter: during one exercise, f-15 and f-16 jet fighters took off from kwangju air base. the pilots performed role play exercises taking the parts of ally or enemy. the organizers put guided bombs and missiles on display at the base. personnel can load the weapons on to fighter jets to attack enemy aircraft or ships. >> translator: any power that threatens peace on the korean peninsula will be thoroughly defeated. >> reporter: the allies air forces hold regular drills twice a year. they want to prepare for the possibility of a confrontation with north korea or attacks on military bases in south korea. the pilots say if those things happe
of the immigrant resource center, who was trying to help low- income immigrants adjust to life in the u.s. new life after amnesty, a lot of people were not able to immigrate because of a lack of money. still to this point, i see a lot of immigrants who want to get their work permits. i ask them how long they have been here. sometimes they have been here since the 1970's, 1980's, 1990's. a lot of them are elderly who are ready to retire. i had 165-year-old man who is alone, no family -- a 65-year- old man who is alone, no family here, but he does not have any papers to get that social security that he has contributed to for 30 years. he will be homeless after working for many years. i faced this situation with my clients a lot. i help low income people. sometimes it is very difficult. sometimes i think about how small the world is a and i see how immigration laws are changing. immigration rates started about 40 years ago and i started to see my client to come to me. my husband has been here 10 years and all of a sudden, his employer is asking for a work permit. we have two children. we just bought a
, people in okinawa are marking 40 years since the u.s. returned control of the prefecture to the japanese government. u.s. officials administered the island for 27 years after world war ii. residents and leaders already gathering to commemorate the anniversary. and james tengan is covering the event for us. james? >> reporter: the ceremony to mark the anniversary starts at 4:00 p.m. local time. it will take place at the okinawa convention center which you can see right behind me. the center is probably a fitting venue for this event in another sense. the convention hall is just one kilometer from the u.s. marine corps futenma air station. in fact, the convention center stands on land that used to host u.s. army facilities. the land was returned to japan 36 years ago. and the convention center was built as part of projects to commemorate okinawa's return to japan. about 1,200 people are expected to attend the event, including japanese prime minister yoshihiko noda, nakayma and john roos. for many islanders, the return of okinawa offers the promise of stability and basic human rights under
>>> exit straeng strategy. president obama outlines it. >>> welcome to nhk "newsline." >> u.s. soldiers have been fighting in afghanistan for more than a decade now. their commander in chief made a surprise visit to the country to talk about his plans to bring them home. president obama promised 23,000 soldiers will withdraw by the end of the summer, and he also solidified a u.s. roll in afghanistan one all combat troops go home. >> today i signed a historic agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new kind of relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation, and we build an equal partnership between two sovereign states. >> obama and afghan president karzai signed a strategic partnership agreement. it cements of u.s. commitment to afghanistan after american combat troops leave in 2014. it will be effective until 2024. the deal allows u.s. forces to train afghan soldiers and engage in sweep operations against al qaeda. >> our goal is to destroy al qaeda, and we are on a path to do exactly t
welcome to newsday. our headlines this hour, making a direct appeal, the chinese dissident phones u.s. congress from his hospital room. >> my mother and my brothers, and i really want to know what is going on with them. >> fleeing for their lives. tens of thousands try to escape the escalating violence. we have a special report. >> end of an era. for the first time in more than 40 years japan is to end all production in nuclear power. and tension between britain and argentina over the falkland islands. this is newsday. >> bilateral talks between the u.s. and china in beijing appeared to be over shattered by the case of the chinese dissident. speaking by phone to an emergency congressional hearing on thursday, he made an impassioned plea for help, claiming his family was not saved and confirming he wanted to leave china with the u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. there has been mounting pressure on the u.s. to help him leaves. >> china's handi is how one paper describes him. what critics see as his abandonment prompted an emergency meeting in congress. he told his friend who tran
is affiliated with the u.s. automaker chrysler. their plan called for mazda to supply its sports car sold as the roadster in japan to fiat. fiat which market their model under alfa romeo. the executives may also consider working together on eco-friendly technology. that could include improvements to fuel efficient engines developed by mazda. managers at mazda are looking to expand sales overseas, a tie-up with fiat would help. fiat was the world's seventh largest automaker by sales in 2011. >>> on to our next news now. north korean officials indicate they have no intention of carrying out a nuclear test. western diplomats have warned of that possibility for weeks. but state media reports the north koreans are focused instead on putting a satellite into space. >> the korean central news agency quoted a spokesperson for the foreign ministry. the official warned north korean officials will have to take countermeasures if the u.s. continues to press for tougher sanctions. >>> and the senior u.s. diplomat for korea is leaning on chinese leadership for their help. glenn davis wants them to use
have tended to support, not invalidate, the u.s. decision's of july. always mindful of his nato responsibilities, he added a further problem is that our allies outside of the four are becoming increasingly concerned over the dangers of the situation and under a system which they feel does not respect their desire for adequate consultation. in keeping with this moderate and realistic approach to the military buildup, submitting his plan of action, nato europe to the north atlantic council on august 21st, 1961. the plan set forth proposals for increasing the strength of the alliance's conventional forces by bringing existing units up to full strength. he did not simply want to create new, but essentially hollow divisions. his proposals would increase nato's strength from the equivalent of 16 full divisions to 24 by the end of the year. soon afterward, a new controversy arose to the berlin crisis. september 1st, 1961, powers gave nato secretary general their draft instructions to general norstad. because these instructions used certain words it was clear they were not just limited
infrastructure to schools to justice systems. the u.s. can't be in a nation-building mode. jump starting is still plenty ambitiou ambitious. we cannot afford to work on priorities seven or eight. we need to work on one, two, three. we have to be catalytic. we need to make sure those people have the ability to make it on their own. next, the strategy leads directly to making sure that people and programs, resources address the priorities. burma will be a challenge in this regard. it's exotic, it's safe, everyone wants to work there. but to work together will be a centerpiece our being effected. finally, we need to make sure that we are measuring and adjusting our work as we go. learning in real time and not learning two years after the fact. with this approach, we in the u.s. government can greatly increase our chances of success. it will help us work better with all of you hopefully in a transformati transformati transformational way. at cso, we recognize we have the coming year to improve the response to show change and impact. so for this year, we told the secretary we have three goals. first,
left the u.s. embassy in beijing. chen guangcheng spent a week in protective custody there after he escaped from house arrest. he's expected to be reunited with his family. a chinese ministry spokesperson says chen left the embassy of his own free will. a lawyer who supports the activist told nhk that embassy officials accompanied chen to a hospital for a check-up. the chen issue is threatening to overshadow high level and strategic economic talks between china and the u.s. they have been looking forward to the dialogue for a chance to push china on pressuring iran and north korea over their nuclear programs. assistant secretary of state kirk campbell had been in intensive discussions in beijing to strike a deal over chen before the arrival of secretary of state hillary clinton. the issue is making chinese officials furious. a foreign ministry spokesperson said they are extremely unhappy the u.s. embassy took chen into custody. he said americans are interfering in chinese domestic affairs and demanded they apologize. beijing and washington are both refusing to comment on specifics a
>>> common threat. the leaders of japan and the u.s. vow to stay united in the face of any future provokeations by north korean authorities. the leaders of japan and the united states are trying to show solidarity with common challenges and common threats. they met in washington and emphasized the importance of the decades old alliance on maintaining security. they titled it a shared vision for the future. the documents said the japan-u.s. alliance said the foundation of peace and stability in the region. >> translator: the asia pacific region is at the center of the world development. they had factors such as fears over north korea. they had a maritime dispute. we will realize the realignment of forces to strengthen the security of the region. >> he was referring to china and taiwan. their governments are allocating more money to military spending. they are involved in territorial disputes with japan. obama calls the region strategically important and stresses a military presence there will be geographically distributed and operationally resilient. >> the u.s.-japan alliance wi
it would take 10 years to get it. my grandmother is a u.s. citizen and today my parents and my sister, my entire family here are citizens. i am the only undocumented in my family. that is because immigration officials refused to follow the law. i will explain why. it took so long to get my parents residency that i aged out. they do not care when you turn 21. they tell you to get in the back of the line. even waiting nine years, they are asking me to go to the back of the line again. i will be 23 by the time i can immigrate to the country legally. in the meantime, growing up, my parents had no idea this would happen. i graduated from college with a bachelor's in political science with a master's i as well. we fought hard to stay in the country. according to the law of the land, i am supposed to be able to use my old date for filing for immigration to the country, but so far immigration is refusing to let me use that old date, so i am in a month now. i cannot go back to fiji because i would have a 10-year ban on me. my mother has a small cleaning business she need help with. when i was in c
detroit on christmas day 2009. it failed to detonate. u.s. officials say a similar bomb with a more sophisticated the commander was to be used in its latest plot. -- sophisiticated detonator was to be used in its latest plot. contained a hard to detect chemical. it has not been confirmed if the latest bomb contained the same explosive. it is now being examined by the fbi. u.s. defence secretary leon panetta gave a few details about the case. >> i do not comment on specific classified operations. other than to say that the united states in gauges in a number of operations to go after al qaeda and other militant allies. what this incident makes clear is that this country has to continue to remain vigilant against those that would seek to attack this country. we will do everything necessary to keep america safe. >> it is not clear whether the bomb would have been detected by airport security. it does not contain metal, so conventional detectors would not have picked it up. the question is whether the new body scanners in many world airports would have discovered it. the plot was the wo
it for the first time. we are learning new details and frustrated parents of a captive american soldier revealing u.s. negotiations with the taliban to try to win his freedom. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> anyone cheering president obama's new stance on same-sex marriage has vice president joe biden to thank. the president himself is now confirming what many had suspected that the vice president forced the president's hand when biden announced his support for gay marriage over the weekend and now we're hearing that's a sore subject at least among some white house insiders. our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin is working the story for us. what are you hearing over there, jessica? >> reporter: wolf, there are times when a president is more forgiving than his aides and this may be one of those times. some of the president's top aides are deeply annoyed. they acknowledge the president was going to come out and speak out in favor of same-sex marriage before the democratic convention, but boy, are they frustrated that vice presiden
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